COMPUTER ANIMATION

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Credits
6
Types
Specialization complementary (Computer Graphics and Virtual Reality)
Requirements
This subject has not requirements

Department
CS
We introduce the essential tools for the animation of different objects, ranging from simple point particles to articulated humanoids. Continuous physically-based animation is compared to discrete, mainly rule based, animation in order to obtain a wide picture of the present animation methods. Character animation techniques are studied ranging from one character to large crowds.

Teachers

Person in charge

  • Nuria Pelechano Gomez ( )

Others

  • Antonio Susin Sanchez ( )

Weekly hours

Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
2
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
2

Competences

Technical Competences of each Specialization

Computer graphics and virtual reality

  • CEE1.1 - Capability to understand and know how to apply current and future technologies for the design and evaluation of interactive graphic applications in three dimensions, either when priorizing image quality or when priorizing interactivity and speed, and to understand the associated commitments and the reasons that cause them.
  • CEE1.2 - Capability to understand and know how to apply current and future technologies for the evaluation, implementation and operation of virtual and / or increased reality environments, and 3D user interfaces based on devices for natural interaction.

Generic Technical Competences

Generic

  • CG1 - Capability to apply the scientific method to study and analyse of phenomena and systems in any area of Computer Science, and in the conception, design and implementation of innovative and original solutions.

Transversal Competences

Solvent use of the information resources

  • CTR4 - Capability to manage the acquisition, structuring, analysis and visualization of data and information in the area of informatics engineering, and critically assess the results of this effort.

Basic

  • CB7 - Ability to integrate knowledges and handle the complexity of making judgments based on information which, being incomplete or limited, includes considerations on social and ethical responsibilities linked to the application of their knowledge and judgments.
  • CB9 - Possession of the learning skills that enable the students to continue studying in a way that will be mainly self-directed or autonomous.

Objectives

  1. When completing this course, students will understand the concepts behind animation and simulation in computer graphics applications. More specifically they will be able to understand and program algorithms for:
    Related competences: CB7, CB9, CTR4, CEE1.1, CEE1.2, CG1,
    Subcompetences:
    • Particle systems with collision detection and physical forces.
    • Character animation (skin deformation, joints transformation to achieve animations, and real-time techniques for handling animation of multiple character).
    • Navigation techniques to have multiple characters wandering virtual environments in real-time with different models that abstract away the geometry of the environment (roadmaps, cell and portal graphs, cellular automata)
    • Animation of rigid bodies, mass-spring models, and articulated chains.
    • Crowd simulation methods.

Contents

  1. Particle systems and collision handling
    Particles are introduced as the simplest animation objects. General features like state vector, forces, energies, numerical solvers, etc., are defined together with interactions (collisions) with other scene objects. Simulation examples are explosions, fireworks, smoke, fountains and rain.
  2. Mass-spring models
    The mass-spring model allow us to animate more complex objects built from interrelated particles. Definition of the internal deformation forces. Examples are combined in their 1-dim (rubber-band, rope, etc.), 2-dim (cloth, flags, curtains, etc.) and 3-dim (soft bricks, jelly, etc.).
  3. Rigid bodies and articulated chains.
    Animation of single rigid bodies (spheres, dice, etc.) and their interaction. Articulated rigid body chains. Interaction between solid and deformable objects.
  4. Navigation.
    Cell and portal graphs, path finding, roadmaps.
  5. Character Animation.
    Keyframing, skinning, motion capture and motion graphs.
  6. Crowd simulation.
    social forces, rule based models, cellular automatas, precomputed search trees.

Activities

Lectures

Material will be presented in lectures along the term.
Theory
26
Problems
0
Laboratory
24
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
20
  • Problems: Implementation of algorithms seen in the theory class to understand in depth the concepts behind animation in computer graphics applications

Attendance at other Student Presentations

Theory
3.5
Problems
0
Laboratory
0
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
0

Teaching methodology

For this course the teacher provides theoretical lectures and materials (articles) for the students to read. During the lectures the students will learn the most important concepts regarding animation and simulation, and will receive advice and guidelines for the preparation and implementation of their programming projects.
During the laboratory classes, the students will receive further lectures focused on the relevant topics towards completing their programming projects, and will have time to work in the class being helped by the professor when needed.

Evaluation methodology

The course assessment is based on three types of activities:

- Projects: 80%
- Student presentation 10%
- Research report: 10%

Bibliografy

Basic:

Complementary:

  • Game Physics - Eberly, David H., Elsevier , 2004. ISBN: 1558607404

Web links

Previous capacities

The course assumes advanced C++ programming skills, computer graphics, and Artificial Intelligence.