Advanced Programming Concepts

You are here

Credits
6
Department
CS
Types
Specialization complementary (Software Engineering)
Requirements
  • Prerequisite: PROP
  • Prerequisite: IES

Teachers

Person in charge

  • Jordi Delgado Pin ( )

Weekly hours

Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
2
Guided learning
0.4
Autonomous learning
5.6

Competences

Transversal Competences

Teamwork

  • G5 - To be capable to work as a team member, being just one more member or performing management tasks, with the finality of contributing to develop projects in a pragmatic way and with responsibility sense; to assume compromises taking into account the available resources.
    • G5.2 - To plan the objectives, operation rules, responsibilities, agenda and review procedure of the work. To identify conflicts, negotiate and solve them in a effective way. To adapt oneself to different kinds of groups (big/small, technical/mixed, same space/at distance). To interact efficiently and promote the participation with other group members.

Technical Competences of each Specialization

Software engineering specialization

  • CES1 - To develop, maintain and evaluate software services and systems which satisfy all user requirements, which behave reliably and efficiently, with a reasonable development and maintenance and which satisfy the rules for quality applying the theories, principles, methods and practices of Software Engineering.
    • CES1.1 - To develop, maintain and evaluate complex and/or critical software systems and services.
    • CES1.3 - To identify, evaluate and manage potential risks related to software building which could arise.
    • CES1.7 - To control the quality and design tests in the software production

Objectives

  1. Review the concepts of object-oriented programming in order to ensure a common knowledge base from which to proceed with the specific subject matter of the course and to know a dynamic and object oriented programming language such as Smalltalk.
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3, CES1.7,
  2. Learn the basics of computational reflection, so that the student is able to understand how these concepts are implemented in different programming languages
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3, CES1.7,
  3. Knowing how computational reflection is implemented in Java and Smalltalk: accessing and modifying members of classes at runtime, creating code at runtime, etc..
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3, CES1.7,
  4. Being able to develop a computer program of small-middle size that uses reflection techniques
    Related competences: CES1.1, G5.2, CES1.7,
  5. Learn the basic concepts of aspect oriented programming, so that the student is able to understand how these concepts are implemented in different programming languages
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3,
  6. Learn AspectJ, an implementation of AOP for Java and delve into details of a specific implementation of the concepts learned.
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3, CES1.7,
  7. Learn the basic concepts of prototype based programming, so that the student is able to understand how these concepts are implemented in different programming languages
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3, CES1.7,
  8. Learn a language based on prototypes so that the student is able to get the general concepts in a concrete implementation (presumably this would be JavaScript or Self)
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3,
  9. Knowing what a closure is and some techniques associated with their use.
    Related competences: CES1.1, CES1.3,

Contents

  1. Review of object oriented programming and Introduction to Smalltalk
    Philosophy and origins. Encapsulation, members private / (protected) / public, inheritance, polymorphism, early / late binding. Patterns. Smalltalk, learning the language and the Pharo environment.
  2. Reflection: General concepts
    What is reflection?. Types of reflection: Introspection, intercession, reification. Implications of reflection for a programming language. Reflection in object-oriented programming.
  3. Reflection in Java and Smalltalk
    Using java.lang.reflect and Smalltalk. Access to classes members at runtime. Patterns and Reflection. Creating reflective objects. Code Generation at runtime.
  4. Aspect Oriented Programming: General concepts
    Encapsulation of cross-cutting concerns, dynamic and static. Join points, pointcuts and aspects. Weaving mechanisms
  5. AspectJ: AOP in Java
    Implementation of the concepts considered in the general description of AOP in the context of the Java programming language: Join points, pointcuts, aspects, advices, weaving mechanisms, etc..
  6. Prototype based programming
    Classes vs. prototypes. Inheritance vs. cloning. Delegation. Closures and techniques associated with their use.

Activities

Review of Object Oriented Programming: Generalities

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
0
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
0
Objectives: 1
Contents:

Introduction to Smalltalk

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
4
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
0
Objectives: 1
Contents:

Reflection: General concepts

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
2
Guided learning
2
Autonomous learning
10
Objectives: 2
Contents:

Reflection in Java (java.lang.reflect) and Smalltalk

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
10
Problems
0
Laboratory
8
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
15
Objectives: 3 4
Contents:

Aspect Oriented Programming: General concepts

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
2
Problems
0
Laboratory
2
Guided learning
2
Autonomous learning
10
Objectives: 5
Contents:

AspectJ: AOP in Java

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
8
Problems
0
Laboratory
6
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
15
Objectives: 6
Contents:

Prototype based programming

The student should pay attention to the lecture and he/she should work through the exercises suggested by the lecturer.
Theory
4
Problems
0
Laboratory
6
Guided learning
0
Autonomous learning
14
Objectives: 7 8 9
Contents:

Teaching methodology

Teaching the course is structured in lectures and laboratory sessions.

Teachers will use lectures to introduce the essential contents of the course. In the laboratory sessions the contents of the course will be brought to the computer by carrying out practical problems. The laboratory classes will be a continuation of the lectures, where new concepts will be implemented as they appear in lectures.

Evaluation methodology

Grading the course will consist of two theoretical tests (T1 and T2), one mid-course and the other at the end, and one medium-sized practical work (P), plus some consideration of other aspects mainly related to participation (Pa) in class and directed activities (AD).

Then, the evaluation method would be:
0.6 * Theory + Practice * 0.35 + 0.05 * (Pa+AD)
where:
Theory: 0.4 * T1 + 0.6 * T2

Teamwork:

Evaluated using a simple rubric that each group tutor group uses
to rank different aspects of teamwork of every member of the group.

Bibliografy

Basic:

Complementary:

Web links

Previous capacities

Students should have enough knowledge of data structures and algorithms and object oriented programming and design.